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Trial Starts For Ex-Fort Worth Police Officer Who Fatally Shot Atatiana Jefferson

Fort Worth, TX – The trial for the former Fort Worth police officer charged with murder in the 2019 shooting death of Atatiana Jefferson in her home began on Monday.

Aaron Dean, who resigned from the Fort Worth Police Department just days after the incident, fatally shot 28-year-old Jefferson after he responded to her home for a report of an open structure in the early morning hours of Oct. 12, 2019.

The call for service was dispatched as a potential burglary report – not as a welfare check like Jefferson’s neighbor allegedly intended, Fort Worth Police Department (FWPD) then-Interim Chief Ed Kraus said at the time.

According to court documents, Jefferson’s eight-year-old nephew told police that he and his aunt were playing video games inside their home when they suddenly “heard noises coming from outside,” KXAS reported.

Jefferson then retrieved a handgun from her purse and “pointed it toward the window,” at which point she “was shot and fell to the ground,” according to an arrest warrant.

“Perceiving a threat, the officer drew his duty weapon and fired one shot striking the person inside the residence,” the FWPD in a news release. “Officers entered the residence locating the individual and a firearm…”

The officer did not announce himself as law enforcement, bodycam footage showed.

Dean subsequently resigned from the FWPD and was charged with murder two days after the fatal shooting, ABC News reported.

He has been out of jail on a $200,000 bond.

The trial was delayed numerous times over the years due to a change of judges, the pandemic, and other issues, KDFW reported.

Dean’s lead defense attorney, Jim Lane, died last week as jury selection was set to begin, according to ABC News.

District Judge George Gallagher opted to continue with the jury selection.

Gallagher denied defense’s request for a change of venue on Monday morning, KDFW reported.

Court will only be in session for a half day on Monday in order to give Lane’s colleagues time to attend his funeral, according to WFAA.

The trial is expected to last for two weeks, CNN reported.

Dean faces between five and 99 years in prison if he is convicted, according to KDFW.

The incident began at approximately 2:25 a.m. on Oct. 12, 2019, when Fort Worth police received a call from Jefferson’s neighbor, James Smith, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported at the time.

Smith told the non-emergency dispatcher that he noticed that his neighbor’s doors were open and their lights were still on, which was unusual for that time of night.

He said that Jefferson lived at the East Allen Avenue home with her eight-year-old nephew.

But the call for service was dispatched as a potential burglary report – not as a welfare check like her neighbor intended.

As a result, the officers responded to the call differently than they would have if the call would have been dispatched as a welfare check.

Phoenix Law Enforcement Association President Michael “Britt” London said that officers approach “open structure” calls more cautiously due to the wide array of scenarios that could lead to such a call being made, CNN reported.

“You are at a higher sensitivity to what is going on with that house,” London told the news outlet. “You have to be ready for anything. You are taking more of your environment in consideration to be ready for a surprise if there’s one.”

Officers generally consider the possibility of burglary when handling such calls, CNN reported.

According to court documents, Jefferson’s nephew told police that he and his aunt were playing video games inside their home when they suddenly “heard noises coming from outside,” KXAS reported.

Jefferson then retrieved a handgun from her purse and “pointed it toward the window,” at which point she “was shot and fell to the ground,” according to an arrest warrant.

Bodycam footage showed the officers as they checked on two open doors. They then made their way down a driveway to the back portion of the residence.

Dean opened a gate and came upon a darkened window to his right, the video showed.

“Put your hands up!” he suddenly ordered, with his duty weapon and flashlight pointed at the window. “Show me your hands!”

He then fired a single round, fatally wounding Jefferson, who died at the scene, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported.

“Perceiving a threat, the officer drew his duty weapon and fired one shot striking the person inside the residence,” the FWPD in a news release. “Officers entered the residence locating the individual and a firearm and began providing emergency medical care.”

Dean, who was hired by FWPD in August of 2017, was placed on administrative leave on Oct. 13, 2019.

He resigned from the force the following day, just hours before he was arrested for murder, The Dallas Morning News reported.

Had he not resigned, then-Chief Kraus said Dean would have fired the officer “for violations of several policies,” to include the FWPD’s use-of-force, de-escalation, and unprofessional conduct policies.

Written by
Holly Matkin

Holly is a former probation and parole officer who is married to a sheriff’s deputy. She is a regular contributor to Signature Montana magazine, and has written feature articles for Distinctly Montana magazine.

View all articles
Written by Holly Matkin

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