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911 Dispatcher Accused Of Hanging Up On Employee Reporting Active Shooter At Grocery Store

Buffalo, NY – An Erie County 911 dispatcher has been placed on administrative leave after she allegedly hung up on a Tops Supermarket manager who called to report an active shooter inside the store on Saturday.

The gunman ultimately murdered 10 people and wounded three more during the deadly rampage.

Tops Assistant Office Manager Latisha Rogers said she was at work on May 14 when she heard gunshots ring out, WGRZ reported.

Rogers said she pulled out her phone and called 911 as the gunfire continued.

“The dispatcher comes on and I’m whispering to her and I said ‘Miss, please send help to 1275 Jefferson there is a shooter in the store,’” Rogers told WGRZ. “She proceeded in a very nasty tone and says ‘I can’t hear you. Why are you whispering, you don’t have to whisper, they can’t hear you,’ so I continued to whisper and I said ‘ma’am he’s still in the store, he’s still shooting! I’m scared for my life, please send help.’”

Rogers said she was so terrified she dropped her phone during the call.

“Out of nervousness, my phone fell out of my hand,” she told WGRZ. “She said something I couldn’t make out, and then the phone hung up.”

When Erie County officials learned of Rogers’ allegations, they pulled the 911 recordings to review them, according to the news outlet.

The 911 dispatcher was placed on administrative leave on Monday and is expected to be fired.

She has been with the Central Police Services for eight years, WGRZ reported.

“On Monday the individual was put on administrative leave pending a hearing which will be held on May 30 in which our intention is to terminate the 911 call taker who acted totally inappropriately not following protocol,” Erie County Executive Mark Poloncarz confirmed.

Additional calls to 911 were properly handled and dispatched, and officers arrived at the scene of the mass shooting within two minutes, Buffalo Mayor Byron Brown told WGRZ.

Erie County Assistant District Attorney Gary Hackbush announced on Wednesday that an Erie County grand jury voted to indict the mass shooter, according to the Washington Post.

The suspect previously pleaded not guilty to a first-degree murder charge in connection with the massacre, CNN reported.

The exact charges he will be facing have not been made public, but additional charges are expected, according to the Washington Post.

An arraignment has been scheduled for June 9.

Buffalo Police Commissioner Joseph Gramaglia said the 18-year-old gunman primarily targeted black victims and described the mass shooting as a hate crime, CNN reported.

“The evidence that we have uncovered so far makes no mistake that this is an absolute racist hate crime. It will be prosecuted as a hate crime,” Commissioner Gramaglia said on Sunday. “This is someone who has hate in their heart, soul and mind.”

The deadly attack occurred at Tops Supermarket on Jefferson Avenue at approximately 2:30 p.m. on May 14, CNN reported.

Erie County District Attorney John Flynn said the suspect, who was wearing tactical gear, used an “assault weapon” to murder three people out in the store’s parking lot.

A fourth victim was wounded.

The gunman then went into the bustling store and opened fire on the business’s armed security guard, 55-year-old retired Buffalo Police Officer Aaron Salter.

The retired officer shot the gunman multiple times, but the suspect’s armor-plated protective gear stopped the rounds, WIVB reported.

Salter was ultimately killed in the shootout, according to police.

“He was very heavily armed,” Commissioner Gramaglia said of the gunman, according to CNN. “He had tactical gear, he had a tactical helmet on, he had a camera that he was livestreaming what he was doing.”

After killing the retired police officer, the suspect shot nine more people inside the grocery store, according to investigators.

Eleven of the victims were black and two were white, WGRZ reported.

Four of those who were shot were employees at the store.

The gunman ultimately surrendered to police outside the business.

“He came out, he put the gun to his head, to his chin,” witness Grady Lewis recounted, according to CNN. “Then he dropped it and took off his bulletproof vest, then got on his hands and knees and put his hands behind his back.”

“I thought they were going to shoot him but they didn’t shoot him,” Lewis told reporters. “I still don’t even believe it happened … that a person would go into a supermarket full of people. It was horrible, it was really horrible.”

The nine other victims killed in the mass shooting have been identified as 86-year-old Ruth Whitfield, 77-year-old Pearly Young, 72-year-old Katherine Massey, 67-year-old Deacon Heyward Patterson, 65-year-old Celestine Chaney, 32-year-old Roberta Drury, 52-year-old Margus Morrison, 53-year-old Andre Mackneil, and 62-year-old Geraldine Talley, WGRZ reported.

Ruth Whitfield was the mother of Buffalo’s former fire commissioner, Garnell Whitfield, according to WIVB.

Commissioner Gramaglia praised retired Officer Salter for heroically confronting the armed assailant, calling him “a hero in our eyes,” according to WIVB.

“I had the pleasure of knowing him,” Buffalo Police Benevolent Association President John Evans said of the slain officer. “Great guy, well respected, well-liked. This is just horrific. It’s tragic. I don’t know what other words to describe it.”

New York Governor Kathy Hochul announced on Sunday that she has directed $2.8 million in federal and state funding be made available to help the families who have been affected by the mass shooting.

“The past 24 hours have been traumatizing for New Yorkers, and my administration will spare no effort to ensure the victims of this act of terrorism by a white supremacist are receiving all the resources and support they need,” Hochul said in a statement.

“The entire world is watching how we will come together as New Yorkers to overcome this unthinkable tragedy,” the governor added. “Buffalo, my hometown, is the City of Good Neighbors and New York State will be good neighbors for them.”

Investigators said the suspect made many disturbing statements about his hatred for the black community after his arrest, CNN reported.

He also allegedly posted a 180-page “white supremacist manifesto” online prior to traveling approximately 200 miles from Conklin to carry out the livestreamed attack, according to the news outlet.

“We are obviously going through that with a fine-toothed comb and reviewing that for all evidence that may lead us to besides the manifesto itself,” Flynn told CNN.

The manifesto contained white supremacist ideology including anti-black and anti-Semitic statements.

In the manifesto, the killer stated he chose his location due to its high population of black people and the strict gun control laws which would limit who could fight back against him.

Commissioner Gramaglia said police believe the shooter acted alone and that he conducted reconnaissance at the store the day prior to the massacre, CNN reported.

“We continue to investigate this case as a hate crime, a federal hate crime and as a crime perpetrated by a racially motivated, violent extremist,” FBI Buffalo Field Office Special Agent In Charge Stephen Belongia said.

Tops Markets, which owns the store where the attack occurred, said it will provide free transportation to local residence to ensure they are still able to access groceries and medications.

Written by
Holly Matkin

Holly is a former probation and parole officer who is married to a sheriff’s deputy. She is a regular contributor to Signature Montana magazine, and has written feature articles for Distinctly Montana magazine.

View all articles
Written by Holly Matkin

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